About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobody foresaw. >> meanwhile back home in washington, congress is off for a week for the thanksgiving holiday, lawmakers are vowing to get to the bottom of intelligence questions in the immediate wake of the deadly attack of a u.s. consulate in libya, including whether ambassador susan rice's so-called talking points were altared the weekend after she gave that announcem of the attack. >> she didn't know anything about the attack in benghazi and the most politically compliant person. i don't know what she knew, but i know that the story she told was misleading. >> the debate on the hill intensified by general david petraeus' testimony friday th
condemning the bus bombing, going on record saying that the u.s. will stand with its israeli allies. joining me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a ce
in mark ginsberg who served as u.s. ambassador to morocco and deputy senior adviser to president carter on middle east policy. ambassador, good to have you back. you have people like senator john mccain saying the united states needs to rebuke more and so far the state department, the response very tentative expressing resolve and urging them to resolve the differences peacefully. is this a situation where the u.s. needs to apply more pressure or should we step back and let egyptian leaders work this out themselves? >> craig, elections have consequences and after all the egyptian people voted to put morsi and his party into power. the real struggle here as jim just mentioned is about the future of the parliament that was disbanded and the constitutional drafting committee whether or not in the end these two bodies will wind up reinforcing the islamization of egypt's society and this wasn't a close election so there is a divided country in egypt and this will have to play itself out. i don't think the united states should put took bogs in the fight at this point because we have bigger fi
cuomo and governor bloomberg. and there are two closed door meetings on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. one is taking place with the house intelligence committee and the the other with the house foreign affairs committee. there are new developments on the david petraeus front. testimony from members of congress will be happening. the general is set to brief the house intelligence committee tomorrow and likely the senate intelligence committee as well. now the defense secretary leon panetta came out ordering an investigation of legal and ethical issues among military leaders. the president giving his first remarks yesterday on the scandal that prompted the president to resign. >> we're safer because of the work that dpaifd petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on. and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> the president also took leading republicans to task for attacks on the ambassador susan rice and comments she made just days after the deaths of four am
cease-fire between israel and hamas militants brokered by the u.s. government and egyptian president morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the
could even get the plan with the lowest part d premium in the u.s. call now for a free information kit. you'll receive a summary of plan benefits and an enrollment form. aarp medicarerx plans insured through unitedhealthcare. call today. ♪ ♪ you don't know, oh, you don't know ♪ ♪ oh ♪ that's what makes you really bull ♪ >> they rock right there. well from overeating to overcrowding. if you don't want to fight the crush of shoppers this black friday, consider heading out tomorrow to support your local mom and pop stores on small business saturday. that's when many locally owned stores will be offering wig discounts. j.j. ramburg, host of msnbc "your business." good morning. very early out there in the l.a. area. >> it is early. >> i know that you're going to get out there early tomorrow. we have the black friday. we have cyber monday coming up in a few base. small business saturday, why the need for that? >> well, look, there are a lot of small businesses out there that don't get the same kind of press as the big box stores because we are watching all these people rush to op
, the u.s. embassies in tanzania responsibled. susan rice is certainly feeling heat over that role and security issues about those embassies. she was the assistant secretary of state for african-americans within the clintoned a hin strags at that time. so what is your response to those attacks of susan rice calling those incidents into question present day? >> well, assistant secretary of africa handles policy towards africa. policy towards kenya. towards south africa. sudan. an assistant secretary is not intimately involved with security. and in this case it was terrorist attack. yes, she's aware of some of the issues, but that's not her direct responsibility. she's worried about american policy. at the time we were dealing with a lot of issues in south africa in the c ochlco this. congo, a number of piece keeping operations. i'm not saying she shouldn't be aware of security issues, but this is not a matter that a policy person directly has responsibility. so it's unfair to target her on those issues, also. >> always great to have you on. >>> and make sure to tune into andrea mitc
, we're talking about what the u.s. gives, $2 billion annually, the imf has $4.8 billion in the reserve fund to help egypt and senator lindsey graham over the weekend was very forceful saying we are watching you. they know full well that aid will be cut off if they don't act accordingly trying to broker a peace deal, correct? >> i would say it's more than just trying to broker a peace deal. i think it's fulfilling its obligations. in the first sense its international obligations. one thing the president morsi understood is if hamas continued to do what it was doing and if the pressures on him led to him breaking the peace treaty with israel, then it wasn't just american assistance that would be put at risk. it would be all the assistance internationally. all the investment egypt would need. so he's putting egypt's needs first and foremost and that suggests that actually the economic imperfect it tiff is trumping the ideological imperatives and that's actually a positive sign for the future. >> with hillary clinton going to the region and with these positive signs that morsi has already
minister, the prime minister assuring president obama according from what we're hearing from u.s. officials, there would not be a full-scale ground assault into gaza unless hamas escalated its moves into southern israel. meaning the rocket attacks. we heard an israeli defense force spokeswoman who said we are currently training and preparing for ground possibilities. which one is it? >> well first of all, military, generally speaking will always, this is their job, and i say this as someone who served in the military, you always have to have a contingency plan. so the fact that for 75 people, 75,000 israeli reservists were authorized to be recruited by the idf. it doesn't mean that the idf is going to use them tomorrow. regarding your first question, the israeli cabinet, the commander-in-chief, gave the israeli defense forces a clear mandate, to remove the threat that we view to be of strategic nature. to remove the threat of rockets and missiles coming into israel from gaza. but the mandate was not limited in time or in scope. so certainly the possibility of an israeli ground, ground force
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been reformed. many of the senior officers are still in positions of power that has led to them continuing many of the brutal tactics that they used under the mubarak era. and today, the people behind me have gathered demanding a few important changes. one, they want president morsi to rescind the decree that he issued on thursday that gave him absolute powers, but more importantly, they want egypt's constitutional assembly. they want writing a new constitution to be more inclusive and reflect egypt's pluralistic viewpoints. the people behind me are the opposition. they have been dormant, haven't been unified. today, many of egypt's more powerful, secular liberal opposition forces have united for the first time. these numbers are unprecedented for them. and i think they are sending from what they're telling me, at least, they're
's unusual somebody we don't know is going to be nominated is working the u.s. senate this hard. is this an ultimate political genius move by the obama white house? are they thinking they're going to take this into a fight for senate confirmation? >> day two of this pr campaign to face the critics on the hill. senator corker is who we're going to have the opportunity to -- rice will have the opportunity to meet with him at noon. in advance of today's meeting, "she always delivers the party line, the company line, whatever the talking points are." is this an example, though, of rice facing critics -- explain the type of diplomacy she would need to display if she's going to go into negotiations with china? it's different than, you know, facing your foes on the hill when you're facing those from a different country. >> right. i think frankly it's inexplicable on the republican side. i do think this is a prelude probably to rice being nominated. and i really don't see how the republicans would stop her from getting the jom nation. nomination. i think the idea that the republicans ar
and spending cuts that if unaddressed could send the u.s. back into a recession. now, if we do dive over this cliff, here's what could happen. first it could cost the average household about $3500 in taxes. second the economy, it could lose 800,000 jobs. and, third, for those already out of work, 2.1 million americans would lose unemployment benefits and right now we're 47 days away from the deadline to prevent all of that. joining me from columbia, south carolina, msnbc contributor jimmy williams with more on why it matters. so, jimmy, "usa today" did this great chart that breaks it all down, the spending or these tax and spending changes go into effect, because americans across the board are going to be affected on this from the top 1% to the nation's poorest so how likely is it that this will happen? >> well, i don't think it's likely that it happens because i think both sides have a hell of a lot to lose. the president having just come off a re-election and gaining seats in the house and the senate, i think that he has political capital. he would lose a lot of that capital if, in fac
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)